Mavs Add Blair and Frontcourt Depth

30 07 2013

BlairMavs

He may have no knees, but he has better knees than another big man the Mavs were pursuing.

The Dallas Mavericks have come to terms on a one-year deal worth $1.4 million (the veteran’s minimum) with DeJuan Blair, according to Marc Stein of ESPN.

The 6-7, 270 lb. power forward/center was drafted No. 37 out of Pittsburgh by the San Antonio Spurs in 2009 and fell that low due to the fact that he has no ACLs in both of his knees. Even though this seems like it would be a cause of concern, he has had a fairly healthy career during his four years with the Spurs, missing only three games during his first three seasons.

Blair has career averages of 7.8 ppg and 5.8 rpg on 52.8 percent shooting from the field. He also has averaged only 18.9 mpg during his four seasons, showing his ability to make an impact with minimal minutes. The 24-year-old bruiser’s per 36-minute stats last season were 13.9 points and 9.7 rebounds on 52.4 percent shooting, according to Basketball Reference. He is known for his scrappy play, rebounding and ability to just find a way to get the ball in the basket. Last season, 81.1 percent of Blair’s shots came in the restricted area or painted non-RA for the Spurs and shot 57.3 percent in these areas. What this means is that Blair does most of his damage in the paint off put-backs or broken plays.

The major downside to Blair’s play is his defense. He may work his tail off on every play, but that’s often not enough when it comes to playing against seven footers in the NBA. Being about as tall as most small forwards, Blair struggles to hold his own against much taller opponents who can shoot over the top of him. Since Brandan Wright (6-9) is also undersized for his position, head coach Rick Carlisle will need to make sure his rotations have enough size on the floor or things could get ugly on defense.

As Mavs fans have grown to love about their own Wright, Blair has always been ready to play, not worrying about his role or how many minutes he gets. (With a coach like Carlisle, who doesn’t care about those things as well, that’s a good quality for a Mav.)

Just take last year’s NBA Playoffs. Due to Tiago Splitter‘s emergence as the starting center, Blair eventually fell almost completely out of Gregg Popovich‘s rotation. That’s why his minutes dropped from 21.3 two seasons ago to 14.0 last season. After only playing trash time in the first two games against the Los Angeles Lakers in the first round, Blair got 14 and 19 minutes in Game 3 and 4, scoring 13 points  in both games on 12-of-15 shooting. He also added 12 total boards.

Even though he didn’t receive consistent minutes during a run to the Finals after being the team’s main center early in his career, Blair didn’t show any sort of frustration or discontent. This team-first attitude is something any organization going in any direction wold be happy to have in the locker room. As Popovich mentioned when asked about Blair falling out of his rotation last season, “To his credit, DeJuan has been a true pro.”

With this signing, it seems that the Mavs have taken themselves out of the Greg Oden race or Oden told them that they were out of the race, so they moved on to Blair. Even if there are those out there that say the Mavs are still in the race, I don’t see Dallas as Oden’s likely destination. It will probably be the New Orleans Pelicans or Miami Heat—teams that can offer him money with no pressure or the chance to win now.

Unlike Oden, who hasn’t played an NBA game since 2009, Blair hasn’t missed a substantial amount of games yet. Oden’s ceiling may be higher than Blair’s, but Blair has a higher floor.

With a higher floor, Blair gives the Mavs a proven rebounder and competitor. For a team whose leading rebounder was their small forward (Shawn Marion) last season, rebounding was clearly an issue. Dallas had a rebounds per game differential of -3.7, which was third worst in the NBA. By bringing in Samuel Dalembert and Blair, the team should be more respectable on the boards.

Dallas management clearly missed out on all their “big fish” targets these past two seasons; however, they do deserve credit for their ability to fill out the roster while maneuvering around the cap line and put together pieces that make the Mavericks a potential playoff team. Mark Cuban and Donnie Nelson should be criticized for the “plan powder dry” approach but praised for finding economically-savvy answers to their roster problems. (The only exception this offseason is Jose Calderon, who was given too long of a contract.) On paper, they have their answers: pass-first point guard (Calderon), No. 2 scorer (Monta Ellis) and low-post defensive presence (Dalembert). And they didn’t go over the cap to fill these needs.

Now it’s just time to see these pieces fit together and give Dirk another shot at a postseason run.

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My Thoughts on one of the Best NBA Games Ever

19 06 2013

“It was by far the best game I’ve ever been a part of.”

Those were LeBron’s words after the roller coaster known as Game 6 of the 2013 NBA Finals found a way to finally find its last loop and come to a halting stop.

The Miami Heat won an overtime thriller 103-100 over the San Antonio Spurs to send this back-and-forth (literally) series to a decisive winner take all Game 7.

Due to my current state of being basketball hungover from that emotionally-draining showcase of basketball and the overwhelming amount of analysis and ideas roaming through my mind, I decided to jot down my impressions in bullet form from one of the best games I’ve ever seen.

 

  • Give the Heat credit. Give that defense that closed out an evenly-matched game credit. They pulled this one out of nowhere as their fans were starting to leave the stadium (shame on all of you), the Spurs fans began to cheer for their soon-to-be fifth championship in 15 years and the Larry O’Brien was actually being wheeled out of a tunnel in preparation for the ceremony. And then it happened…the Spurs threw this game away. I hate saying that because I hated when people said the Heat threw away their championship to the Dallas Mavericks in 2011. It’s disrespectful to ignore the team that actually won the game. However, the Spurs were in complete control of their destiny; they were two rebounds and two free throws away from finishing off this series and this season.Up 93-89 with 28 seconds to go, Manu Ginobili needed to make two free throws to send this one to a six-point game. He went 1-for-2. Then they simply needed to get a defensive rebound off a LeBron James‘ 3-point attempt to further put this game away. They let Mike Miller grab an offensive board and kick it out to LeBron for a 3-pointer. 94-92. After being fouled with 19 seconds to go, all Kawhi Leonard needed to do was make two free throws. He went 1-for-2. Then they simply needed to get a defensive rebound off a James’ 3-point attempt (sound familar?) to further put this game away. Chris Bosh grabbed that season-changing rebound, Ray Allen backed up toward the 3-point line and the rest was truly history. The Spurs could see the trophy and taste this victory. This is one of the most heartbreaking games I’ve ever seen. As Mark Cuban tweeted, “Hate to say this, but this game felt like the Rangers in the World Series.” That gives you an idea of how much this one hurts for San Antonio, who only had to do the simple things to win this game. They are just as resilient as Miami, but I have my doubts that they can muster up the emotional energy to fight back on the Heat’s home floor. That’s aside from the fact that Tim Duncan (44 minutes) and Tony Parker (43 minutes) are probably icing their entire body at the moment. As Ginobili put it, “I have no clue how we’ll get re-energized. But we have to.”
    • However, even though it looks like the Spurs are down and out, I wouldn’t count them out completely. I mean, just look at this series. After every single game so far, the media has practically counted out the loser…and that loser has gone on to win the next game every single time. I know this loss was astronomically more devastating than the other two losses, but as I’ve been saying all playoffs long, when the Spurs “Big 3” all play, they haven’t lost back-to-back since December 12/13. This isn’t a young Pacers’ squad that isn’t going to know how to handle the pressure of a Game 7. This is a Spurs’ squad filled with poised veterans that are ready for the challenge come Thursday night. As Gregg Popovich put it, “we better be real unsatisfied to the point of anger.”
  • This game had it all. The stars. The big runs. The off-the-court storylines. The nail-biting finish. The game-tying shot. The collapse. The weight of the world on so many players. The legacy of one team being salvaged. These two teams just played one of the best games in NBA history. Anybody that was able to watch it should feel thankful to have experienced such a sight.
  • Allen now has 352 postseason 3-pointers, 32 more than Reggie Miller, who is 2nd all-time. He is 12-for-20 in this series and 6-for-9 during the fourth quarter. This is a man of habit that puts up hundreds of shots a day to remain ready to fire from deep and has such a quick release, making it difficult for defenders to close out on his shot. Luck was involved on his huge 3-pointer, but there was little doubt in the Heat players’ minds that Allen would drain it once he released it. He truly is the best 3-point shooter ever.
  • Miller looked like me when I’m trying to get through airport security and Joel Anthony—I mean LeBron looked like a lamp without its shade on. That’s all I have to say about those wardrobe malfunctions.
  • Back to Miller for a second. If Danny Green is going to be praised for his shooting, let us take a moment and give Miller his due attention. This guy’s stroke is so pure right now. He is shooting 78.6 percent (11-for-14) from deep in the NBA Finals. And he is 1-for-1 with one shoe.
  • Commissioner David Stern is planning to retire after this season. I have to say, aside from how you feel about the man, what a way to go out. His league’s television ratings are about to be through the roof (possibly a record), and he gets to see the best two teams in the NBA fighting it out for the trophy. I’m happy for you, David.
  • LeBron (32 points, 10 rebounds, 11 assists) has now had three triple doubles in his past seven NBA Finals games. Whether his headband was really like Clark Kent’s glasses or not, he was changing the nation’s perception of him by the minute during Game 6. He went from choker to headbandless to the greatest ever to a horrible player with Tony Romo characteristics to a triple-double machine that knows how to close out games. Allen and his shot for the ages might have been the biggest help in saving LeBron’s legacy, but you can’t deny that LeBron finally had that vintage “LeBron” performance that so many people were saying he needed to have. He had 18 of his 32 points in the fourth quarter/overtime and wasn’t settling for jumpers. He also guarded Parker for practically the entire game, something I didn’t think he could do, and held him to 6-for-23 shooting from the field. LeBron truly did it all in Game 6, both good and bad. (If you thought that was wild, just wait until Game 7. The social media world will be shifting their opinion on LeBron faster than Boris Diaw moves in a CiCi’s buffet line. I’m sorry, I couldn’t help myself…)
  • LeBron was 5-for-17 with Dwyane Wade on the floor and 6-for-9 with Wade off the floor. He took three restricted area shots and was -19 in 33 minutes with Wade. He took seven restricted area shots +18 in 16 minutes with Wade on the bench. For the entire NBA Finals, LeBron is 20-for-37 (54.1 percent) without Wade on the floor and 35-for-90 (38.9 percent) with Wade on the floor. The very first day this superteam was created in the summer of 2010, the major question was how these two stars would compliment each other’s similar style of play. Well, now with a more hobbled Wade, this foundational problem has come to the surface yet again. With Wade’s lack of shooting, which messes up the team’s spacing, and his need for the ball in his hands (not to mention his desire to not get back on defense and whine just like LeBron), the Heat have, for the most part, been better with him on the bench. During their 33-5 run in Game 2, he was on the bench for pretty much all of that. Having three shooters on the floor along with James and Bosh might give the Heat their best chance to take home this championship. Also, giving Wade selective minutes would allow the injured guard to provide maximum energy during his time on the floor. But does Erik Spoelstra have the guts to cut the minutes of one of his divas? Will he sit Wade for large chunks of the biggest game of the season and possibly his career? Will LeBron wear his headband in Game 7? Why did he look like he could play on Uncle Drew’s squad? I’m sorry, I’m sorry, I got off topic…
  • Kawhi you so mean to Mike’s mouth, Kawhi?
  • Even though Duncan couldn’t finish off this game strong, scoring only five points in the third quarter and failing to score in the fourth quarter/overtime, let’s not forget that he showed the nation one of the best 24 minutes of basketball ever. The Big Fundamental shot 11-for-13 from the field for 25 points in the first half. That’s more than a point a minute. He was completely and utterly dominating Bosh down low. However, due to an increased level of defense from Bosh and the Heat along with Duncan simply running out of gas, this half of basketball will likely be forgotten.
  • Well, Mario Chalmers had one of those games. And what I mean is that he appeared from hiding. After his big 19 points in Game 2, Rio shot 4-for-19 in Games 3, 4 and 5. He had little to no impact in those three games. He came alive Tuesday night, going 7-for-11 from the field and 4-for-5 from 3-point range. I might harp on his inability to play at a consistent level, but he sure came alive when the Heat’s season was on the line. They’ll need him to be big Rio Thursday night.
  • The Heat have been unable to consistently give 100 percent (or at least show it) throughout this entire series. They seem to just wait for a three to five minute stretch to turn it on. Just look at this past game. LeBron looked out of this game mentally as the Spurs took a double-digit lead into the fourth quarter. It took a monster surge by LeBron, some spectacular defensive stops and a phenomenal yet lucky play that led to Ray Allen tying the game with a 3-pointer. (How did he get his feet set and get that shot off? That was madness.) They are obviously favored to finally win back-to-back games on Thursday, but will this team be able to remain locked in for 48 minutes and not let the Spurs jump out to take a lead or go on a run before they realize it’s too late?
  • Ginobili stunk more than he’s ever stunk before in his stunky playoffs. After a spectacular Game 5 performance (24 points, 10 assists), he nine points and eight turnovers in Game 6. EIGHT. Ouch. He went back to throwing bad passes all around the court, looking like he was trying to dribble a football and being a hinderance to the Spurs’ success. If San Antonio wants a chance at winning the last game of this season, Ginobili will need to find that inner competitor in himself that so many people talk about and close out this series looking like the Ginobili we know is still alive. Or at least think is still alive…
  • The last road team to win an NBA Finals Game 7 was Dick Motta’s Washington Bullets vs. Seattle in 1978. Since that series, there have been five Game 7s in the NBA Finals. The home team won all of these games.
  • The quote of the game came from the ever so quotable Popovich who was asked how he will prepare his team for Game 7. “I get ’em on the bus and it arrives on the ramp over here, and we go on the court and we play. That’s how we get ready.” Oh Pop.
  • Embedded image permalinkBosh said before the game, “[Danny Green] won’t be open tonight” and after the game, “I don’t know how we won that game.” Well, you partially answered your own question before the game, Chris. Besides the obviously apparent reasons this team won (LeBron heating up and Allen hitting a game-tying 3-pointer), Bosh’s defense and rebounding might have been the biggest reason this team is still alive. Not only did he have two huge blocks on two of the Spurs’ last three possessions, one that would have given the Spurs the lead and the other that would have sent the game to a second overtime, he grabbed the offensive rebound in the closing minutes of regulation that allowed the Heat to get a second chance at tying things up. Ray Ray capitalized. This is what the Heat need from Bosh—for him to play his role. With Miami’s lack of big men, when Bosh can be a force down low, that gives them a more diverse look. Yes, I’m saying stop shooting 3-pointers. Please, Chris.
  • Question: who is currently leading the Spurs in blocks for this series? Duncan, right? Actually, it’s Danny Green. The shooting phenomenon may be getting attention due to his record-breaking 3-point shooting and for not showing up Tuesday night, going 1-for-7, but this kid is an acceptable defender, especially when getting back to stop the fast break. He should be given credit for his team-leading 10 blocks and ability to stop LeBron when he is in I-Am-Going-To-Barrel-Over-You mode.
  • Popovich messed up. He took both Parker and Duncan out at the start of the fourth quarter, allowing the Heat to get themselves back in a game that they were out of (Miami went on an 8-2 run in less than two minutes). Even though his veteran stars needed a rest, this could have been your last game of the year. You can’t have offensive-lacking Tiago Splitter and Diaw both in the game at such an important part of the game. Then, he decided to keep Duncan, their best rebounder that had 17 on the night, sitting on the bench for the Heat’s final play of regulation. If only Pop could have learned from Frank Vogel and Roy Hibbert that having your best defender/rebounder at the end of games is vital, no matter who is on the floor for the other team. This led to that Allen shot we all keep talking about. Lastly, down by three with a little over a second to go in overtime, Pop needs 3-pointer shooters on the floor, right? Well he had that…and Splitter. Why was Splitter on the floor when he just gives the Heat one less player to guard? I don’t know—it allowed Bosh, their best defender/rebounder who remained on the floor…hmmm, to shift over to Green and block his game-tying 3-point attempt. In a series with the largest difference in age between coaches, the older, wiser, more respected coach seemed to make a few, costly mistakes.
    • In Pop’s defense, mistakes happen. LeBron had a turnover and ridiculous airball during the two crucial possessions before he drained a 3-pointer in the closing minute of the fourth quarter. I know it sounds so cliché, but this is sports—mistakes are going to happen. Even from the best. If Allen had missed that 3-pointer and the Spurs had pulled this one out, the attention would be on LeBron’s two costly mistakes. But most have forgotten about those two errors. I lose no respect for either of these two men because of their slip-ups down the stretch. One is one of the best coaches to ever be a part of the NBA and the other is currently the best basketball player in the world. Play on.

 

Over everything you will hear in the next few days, realize this: Anything can happen in a game 7 of any sport. ANYTHING. These are the best two basketball teams on the planet, going all in to decide who is the champion of an 82-game NBA season. This is no longer a chess match to decide who can out-coach and out-think the other. This is now a match of will. Of heart. Of desire. They each know the other’s moves. They each will put it all on the floor as there is no more basketball to be played after the game’s 48 minutes are no more. Whether you like basketball, the NBA or sports in general, I would advise you to find a television once Thursday night arrives. This will be entertainment at its highest level and be enjoyable for all.

This is going to be fun.

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